A great starting book in this area is Ralph Martin’s The Fulfillment of All Desire. He makes the case for the Catholic faith in an accessible way—relying heavily on the writings of the spiritual masters of our tradition.  Another profitable path to pursue is reading biographies of Jesus Christ.  They deepen our understanding of Scripture, the Mass, and develop our personal relationship with Him.  Pope Benedict XVI recently wrote a three-book series entitled Jesus of Nazareth.  Although it has some theological insights that might challenge a reader unschooled in theology, he has many profound reflections that would be valuable to anyone who read it.  Fulton Sheen, Frank Sheed, and Romano Guardini also wrote excellent works on the life of Jesus.

As a Meditational Hypnotherapist, I provide sessions online and in person combining the best of both Meditation & Hypnosis, along with specific Hz frequencies that I have created (along with harmonic music) to provide healing and transformation for whatever you are struggling with in your life. Each Meditational Hypnosis session delves deeply into your DNA and shifts it into your RNA. To know more about DNA and RNA please see my videos here

Spirituality is an essential part of a fully experienced life. It touches on the deepest part of an individual’s being, as well as the shared experiences of all humans and, more broadly, all living things. Spiritual psychics tap into this mysterious aspect of existence to reveal truths about you, your loved ones, and the underlying ties that connect us all.
Mediumship became quite popular in the 19th-century United States and the United Kingdom after the rise of Spiritualism as a religious movement. Modern Spiritualism is said to date from practices and lectures of the Fox sisters in New York State in 1848. The trance mediums Paschal Beverly Randolph and Emma Hardinge Britten were among the most celebrated lecturers and authors on the subject in the mid-19th century. Allan Kardec coined the term Spiritism around 1860.[12] Kardec claimed that conversations with spirits by selected mediums were the basis of his The Spirits' Book and later, his five-book collection, Spiritist Codification.
Even if you aren’t familiar with tarot-card reading, you’ve likely seen one of the common decks, like the famous Rider-Waite, which has been continually printed since 1909. Named for publisher William Rider and popular mystic A.E. Waite, who commissioned Pamela Colman Smith to illustrate the deck, the Rider-Waite helped bring about the rise of 20th-century occult tarot used by mystical readers.
An online reading takes place via Skype or similar video link. It is carried out in real time, and you will pay up-front when booking the session. It is similar to a telephone reading but with two-way visual contact. It is much more like an in-person consultation. A good medium will try to put you at ease and connect with you on a personal level as it makes it more rewarding for both parties.
The British medium Francis Ward Monck was investigated by psychical researchers and discovered to be a fraud. On November 3, 1876 during the séance a sitter demanded that Monck be searched. Monck ran from the room, locked himself in another room and escaped out of a window. A pair of stuffed gloves was found in his room, as well as cheesecloth, reaching rods and other fraudulent devices in his luggage.[77] After a trial Monck was convicted for his fraudulent mediumship and was sentenced to three months in prison.[78]
After giving me short and pretty generic readings, she would allude to more specific stuff that she'd be happy to tell me if I paid more. I obliged one time to this "upgrade" and yeah, it got slightly more specific. She mentioned an issue with an aunt, which could apply to anyone, but definitely applies to me. She mentioned some incorrect stuff about my parents. Then she tried to bait me one more time into paying more for more information and an energy healing. I declined, paid via credit card, and left.

A widely known channeler of this variety is J. Z. Knight, who claims to channel the spirit of Ramtha, a 30 thousand-year-old man. Others purport to channel spirits from "future dimensions", ascended masters,[32] or, in the case of the trance mediums of the Brahma Kumaris, God.[33] Other notable channels are Jane Roberts for Seth, Esther Hicks for Abraham,[34] and Carla L. Rueckert for Ra.[35][36]
You can find the psychics on various online websites who can offer Tarot Card readings, Palm readings, numerology readings, astrological (birth chart) readings etc. and also help you with issues related to relationships, career or personal life. However, they are generally expensive. I find that local psychics and sensitives ask a more reasonable hourly rate. Because they are in the room with you, you get a more personal relationship as well.
Now, over a hundred years since the release of the Rider-Waite deck, Tarot cards are available in a practically endless selection of designs. In general, many of these follow the format and style of Rider-Waite, although each adapts the cards to suit their own motif. No longer just the domain of the wealthy and upper class, Tarot is available for anyone who wishes to take the time to learn it.
At Waite's suggestion, Smith used the Sola Busca artwork for inspiration, and there are many similarities in the symbolism between Sola Busca and Smith's final result. Smith was the first artist to use characters as representative images in the lower cards. Instead of showing merely a cluster of cups, coins, wands or swords, Smith incorporated human figures into the artwork, and the result is the iconic deck that every reader knows today.
“Etteilla was one of the people who actually made divination so esoteric,” says Matthews. “He created a deck that incorporated all the things from Court de Gébelin and his book ‘Le Monde Primitif’ [‘The Primitive World’], which suggested an Egyptian origin for the tarot and all sorts of arcane things.” Matthews makes a distinction between the tarot’s abstract interpretations and the straightforward “cartomantic” reading style that thrived during the 16th and 17th centuries, prior to Etteilla.
Well, here is where things might be a little more “out there” and magical. You see, we are all connected to a collective, universal wisdom and our inner wisdom. And when we read the Tarot cards—and connect with our intuition—we can tap into this universal wisdom. It’s a little like connecting in with the collective mind, not just the individual mind. 
Sit in on a mediumistic circle to develop your skills. You need others to practice with and to discuss what's working and what's not. You can build strong bonds and make good friends while learning together. Your local spiritualist church is likely to run a mediumistic circle. An 'open circle' is where anyone can come along and join, a 'closed circle' is by invitation only. You can graduate from one to the other. You may be able to find independent spiritual and metaphysical circles online, directed by an experienced medium.
Modern tarot decks, such as we know them, appeared in Italy in the 15th century as series of intricately painted works of art used to play card games. These decks consisted of a varying number of cards and were not specifically created for divination. The first such cards, usually created for noble families to celebrate special occasions, were known in Italy as trionfi (“triumphs” or later, “trumps.”) These trick-taking games later became known by several names, including Tarocchi, Taroc/k, Tarau,and Tarot. Some people even write it as tarrot, taro or tarro - but those spellings are very uncommon.
In 1958, the English-born Spiritualist C. Dorreen Phillips wrote of her experiences with a medium at Camp Chesterfield, Indiana: "In Rev. James Laughton's séances there are many Indians. They are very noisy and appear to have great power. [...] The little guides, or doorkeepers, are usually Indian boys and girls [who act] as messengers who help to locate the spirit friends who wish to speak with you."[20]
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