For example, if a spirit wants to give the psychic medium the name Sandy, they might flash (in the psychic medium’s mind) the face of a person whom the psychic medium knows named Sandy. If they want to get the psychic medium to say the word “coffee,” they might show the psychic medium someone’s cat that had the name Coffee. This can be confusing and requires that the psychic medium interpret what they are seeing in their mind. For instance, the psychic medium might say cat rather than coffee; and to the person being read, the psychic medium might appear wrong when the psychic medium is actually just “misinterpreting” the message.

When we first came here to this earth dimension as Spiritual Soul BEings within physical form, we were telepathic beings free from needing voice or even written communication to gift the ability of communication with other souls as telepathy was and still is if we so choose it to be a form of spiritual communication. It is a picking up on the spiritual energy and spiritual BEing within the physical being that you are. This exists beyond what we call here on the earth dimension as time and space. However, since we are Spiritual Soul BEings choosing a human form experience and within choosing a physical form we remember the Spiritual Soul BEing we are, we choose to play the game of written and auditory words within this Life Experience on this earth dimension. Thus here we are.  
Psychics use different types of ESP (extra sensory perception) to access information from a higher perspective and provide you with answers, clarity, and advice. They can tap into the past, present, and future to gain valuable insight into a situation that is troubling you. Most of them use clairvoyance to see into the future and provide details about what will happen and when. There are some psychic advisors who use clairaudience to hear messages from beyond to help guide you. And others use clairsentience and intuition to feel the answers you're seeking. Regardless of how they get their information, real psychics are able to shed light on a situation and then guide you to the right and best path for you.
I have read several book about mediumship, and currently reading surviving Death, Leslie Kean. I also have read time and again the skeptics crow every time they believe they have exposed fraud. The prance and buck at every attempt to make genuine controlled experiments, such as the Swartz experiments. They will never ever be convinced not ever, because for them the brain is the beginning and the end. Hell will freeze over before these critics would ever be anything other than convinced its all smoke, mirror, frauds and deceptions. Wikipedia-Not a good source for a complete treatment or fair treatment of any subject has several long and lengthy treatises discrediting anything suggestive of survival after the brain is dead.
In 1992, Richard Wiseman analyzed the Feilding report of Eusapia Palladino and argued that she employed a secret accomplice that could enter the room by a fake door panel positioned near the séance cabinet. Wiseman discovered this trick was already mentioned in a book from 1851, he also visited a carpenter and skilled magician who constructed a door within an hour with a false panel. The accomplice was suspected to be her second husband, who insisted on bringing Palladino to the hotel where the séances took place.[181] Massimo Polidoro and Gian Marco Rinaldi also analyzed the Feilding report but came to the conclusion no secret accomplice was needed as Palladino during the 1908 Naples séances could have produced the phenomena by using her foot.[182]
As I’ve already mentioned, I have three of them. Many ordinary people have these guides — it’s not just limited to mediums. They may show themselves in many forms, such as a Franciscan monk, an indigenous person, an ancient Egyptian, or even a child. I believe that they choose to show themselves in these familiar forms for our benefit. I feel that too many people place responsibility on these guides and expect them to do the person’s work. Guides are here to assist us, not make decisions for us. Angels are in a different category from guides — they’re “messengers of God.”
The oldest surviving tarot cards are the 15 or so Visconti-Sforza tarot decks painted in the mid-15th century for the rulers of the Duchy of Milan.[8] A lost tarot-like pack was commissioned by Duke Filippo Maria Visconti and described by Martiano da Tortona probably between 1418 and 1425, since the painter he mentions, Michelino da Besozzo, returned to Milan in 1418, while Martiano himself died in 1425. He described a 60-card deck with 16 cards having images of the Greek gods and suits depicting four kinds of birds. The 16 cards were regarded as "trumps" since in 1449 Jacopo Antonio Marcello recalled that the now deceased duke had invented a novum quoddam et exquisitum triumphorum genus, or "a new and exquisite kind of triumphs".[9] Other early decks that also showcased classical motifs include the Sola-Busca and Boiardo-Viti decks of the 1490s.[1]

The ancestors of what we today know as Tarot cards can be traced back to around the late fourteenth century. Artists in Europe created the first playing cards, which were used for games, and featured four different suits. These suits were similar to what we still use today – staves or wands, discs or coins, cups, and swords. After a decade or two of using these, in the mid-1400s, Italian artists began painting additional cards, heavily illustrated, to add into the existing suits.
The fraudulent medium Ronald Edwin confessed he had duped his séance sitters and revealed the fraudulent methods he had used in his book Clock Without Hands (1955).[164] The psychical researcher Tony Cornell investigated the mediumship of Alec Harris in 1955. During the séance "spirit" materializations emerged from a cabinet and walked around the room. Cornell wrote that a stomach rumble, nicotine smelling breath and a pulse gave it away that all the spirit figures were in fact Harris and that he had dressed up as each one behind the cabinet.[165]
Some think this Everest of a novel the greatest ever written. On the surface, it tells a tale of family feuding and parricide, but underneath, it is really a philosophical quest for a spiritual future for humanity and for Russia. Dostoevsky has divided himself into three characters: Dmitry, the passionate and sensual man; Ivan, the brilliant but skeptical intellectual; and Alyosha, the youngest brother, a follower of a Russian holy man. Dostoevsky knows that a novel is only as strong as its villain, so he gives many of the strongest lines to Ivan, who seeks to discredit God on the grounds that even if things work out all right in the future, he cannot forgive God for the suffering of children in the present. The brothers' arguments are really the dialogues of a soul with itself; we can see that the author is risking everything and is not sure where this will all lead. Dostoevsky is arguing with the most powerful of his own doubts, so we find it incredibly moving when, at the end, this author drawn to darkness and violence turns his back on European materialism and cynicism and passionately embraces a spiritual view of life.
Like common playing cards, the tarot has four suits (which vary by region: French suits in Northern Europe, Latin suits in Southern Europe, and German suits in Central Europe). Each suit has 14 cards, ten pip cards numbering from one (or Ace) to ten and four face cards (King, Queen, Knight, and Jack/Knave). In addition, the tarot has a separate 21-card trump suit and a single card known as the Fool. Depending on the game, the Fool may act as the top trump or may be played to avoid following suit.[1] These tarot cards, without occult symbology, are still used throughout much of Europe to play card games.
Most card readers recognize that the associations and preconceptions of the person being read for are just as important as the actual drawings on the cards: Divination cards offer a way to project certain ideas, whether subconscious or not, and to toy with potential outcomes for important decisions. Thus, like scenes from a picture book, the best illustrations typically offer clear visions of their subjects with an open-ended quality, as though the action is unfolding before you.
It is within an email (and/or recorded session) reading though that the words are infinitely printed, imprinted, or 'I Am' printed, energetically written and encoded words, so that we are able to read them and refer back to them if we find ourselves back in the same place that brought us to asking for a reading to begin with. All email spiritual readings are done the same way that you would receive a phone reading.  The only difference is you receive a hard copy for your viewing at a later time.  This can be most helpful in circumstances in your life to have something you can refer back to that can help you stay on track to create what you desire, shift resonances within a relationship, experiencing a new love or partnership or experience financial and professional success.  Thus the answer is always with you, handy and referable. Much like that of a book, the words are within an email reading arethe 'I Am' printed, or imprint of your soul, infinitely seeable with the physical eyes to remember what the soul of you already and always, always ready and in all ways, knows and is within resonance of. 
All of Kerouac's work constitutes a dialogue between his Buddhist and Hindu learning and the residues of his Catholic upbringing. This autobiographical novel, his most joyous and optimistic work, centers on his meeting and friendship with Gary Snyder (here called "Japhy Ryder"), the American poet and student of Chinese and Japanese culture and Zen Buddhism. Kerouac, the child of immigrants and raised in a Massachusetts mill town, is guided by Gary Snyder, Oregon mountain man and anthropologist, in treks up mountains toward "heaven," and in his first steps toward an ecological view and a path of personal independence. Kerouac, in turn, becomes our guide to the spiritual possibilities inherent in the grandeur and beauty of the great American Northwest. As Kerouac and Snyder trade Buddhist one-liners and bring Eastern thought into contact with native American influences like Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau, and John Muir, we realize we are witnessing a rebirth of American transcendentalism. The book is filled with a youthful energy and idealism that makes you wish you were there with them during a time when anything seemed possible for young Americans and for the American novel. See also5 Must-Read Summer Books
The word tarot is derived from the Italian word tarocchi, which has no known etymology. There are many theories regarding its origin. It may be derived from the name of an Italian river, the Taro. Or perhaps it is of Arabic origin, as playing cards originated in the Middle East, becoming common in Europe by the year 1377 C.E. 18th century occultists claimed the name Tarot came from the conjunction of two Egyptian words meaning “royal road,” which indicated that the tarot was the path to wisdom.

When most people consider consulting a psychic they are usually driven by the need, or desire, to identify and understand the future outcome of a situation or problem. Mostly theses situations relate to love and relationships, career and money. Psychic and spiritual readings are two different things and the type of reading that you choose, when consulting a psychic, medium or clairvoyant, is generally determined and influenced by your own level of spiritual awareness.
Present - The next card, the middle card, represents your present state of being. This card helps you gain perspective on where you are right at this moment, what you are up against and what you have to work with. It may reveal things you are reluctant to acknowledge. For example, you may learn that your current efforts are in vain or that someone you trusted is shifty. On the other hand, you will also learn where your powers lay which you can nourish and grow into the future.
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